Coronavirus: Children half as likely to catch it, review finds

(BBC) – Children and adolescents are half as likely to catch the coronavirus, the largest review of the evidence shows.

The findings, by UCL and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, will feed into the debate about how schools are reopened.

Children also appear less likely to spread the virus, but the team said there was still uncertainty on this.

The UK government is expected to publish its scientific advice on schools later.

However, only England has announced that some primary children (Reception, Year 1 and Year 6) could return to the classroom, sparking concerns about safety.

It is already clear that children are at far less risk of becoming severely ill or dying from coronavirus.

How UK deaths from coronavirus vary by age
Image captionIn the UK, three children under 15 have died with coronavirus

However, two other key questions have proved harder to answer:

  • are children less likely to catch the virus?
  • are children less likely to spread it?

The researchers went through 6,332 studies from around the world – much of it not formally published – to try to get the answers. They identified only 18 with useful data.

These were a mixture of studies that tested how the virus spreads in schools or households through rigorous testing of contacts, as well as studies that test large numbers of people in a population for the virus to see who is carrying it.

The analysis showed children were 56% less likely than an adult to catch the virus when exposed to an infected person.

“Teachers worry about their children and I think it is incredibly reassuring the children they teach are half as susceptible to this virus,” said Prof Russell Viner, from University College London and the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health.

However, the reason why is not clear.

There have been discussions about differences in children’s lungs that make it harder for them to catch the virus or that they are exposed to more colds that are related to the coronavirus, which might lead to some degree of immunity.