Hurricane season 2021: No more Greek storm names

The next super-charged Atlantic hurricane season won’t be able to go to the Greek alphabet for storm names when the established list runs out.

The World Meteorological Organization’s Hurricane Committee decided this week to shelve the Greek names from supplemental storm name lists in future seasons.

Forecasters have only had to resort to using the Greek names only twice: during the historic 2005 and 2020 seasons.

The WMO decided that the use of Greek names was a distraction from the focus on preparedness and safety — and it was also confusing.

The Hurricane Committee decided to create a supplemental list of names from A to Z (except for Q, U and X, Y and Z). Names on the supplemental list could also be retired and replaced if need be.

Tropical systems the Atlantic are named using rotating lists of names that are reused every six years.

Storm names are retired from the list when they are especially deadly or destructive.

The Hurricane Committee removed four names from use this week: Dorian, a Category 5 hurricane which devastated parts of the Bahamas in 2019; Laura, a Category 4 hurricane that made landfall in Louisiana in late August of 2020; and the Greek names of Eta and Iota, both of which hit Nicaragua within weeks of each other in November 2020, killing at least 272 people.

Dorian will be replaced by Dexter, and Laura by Leah.

The Hurricane Committee also decided to keep the start date for the Atlantic hurricane season — June 1 — as is, despite storms forming before the season’s official start every year since 2015.

Here is the 2021 list of storm names for the Atlantic: Ana, Bill, Claudette, Danny, Elsa, Fred, Grace, Henri, Ida, Julian, Kate, Larry, Mindy, Nicholas, Odette, Peter, Rose, Sam, Teresa, Victor and Wanda.

The supplemental names for 2021 are: Adria, Braylen, Caridad, Deshawn, Emery, Foster, Gemma, Heath, Isla, Jacobus, Kenzie, Lucio, Makayla, Nolan, Orlanda, Pax, Ronin, Sophie, Tayshaun, Viviana and Will.

See the lists of storm names through 2025 here.

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