Hurricane Iota Leaves over 12 People Dead in Central America

El Salvador, and the rest of Central American nations, are still on high alert because of the risk of flooding and landslides.

Hurricane Iota, which reached category 5, the maximum on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale, left at least 12 people dead and incalculable material damage during its passage through Central America and the Caribbean.

At 21h00 local time this Tuesday, the weather phenomenon, already a tropical storm, was weakening rapidly in southeastern Honduras, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center (CNH).

Iota had maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour. However, there is still a danger of catastrophic flash flooding and landslides in parts of Central America.

In Nicaragua, Iota entered Monday night as an “extremely dangerous” category 5 hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 250 kilometers per hour. In that country, it affected roads, schools, and health units.

In El Salvador, the National Civilian Police reported a death attributed to the now tropical storm. On Tuesday, a motorcyclist was crushed to death by a tree that was blown down by the wind.

El Salvador, and the rest of Central American nations, are still on high alert because of the risk of flooding and landslides.

In Colombia, President Ivan Duque reported Iota left a dead person, a missing person, and 6,000 victims in the island of Providencia, in the Caribbean, which was practically devastated by the force of the hurricane.

In Panama, the cyclone’s path caused one death in the Ngäbe Bugle Indigenous community. In Honduras, three people died because of the phenomenon.