SVG Relief Inc and Garifuna Indigenous People of SVG offers support for trough Victims

Volunteers pack barrels with relief supplies.

Vincentians in the United States displayed their true patriotism by lending a helping hand, when most needed, and by providing much-needed relief to nationals affected by the recent storms at home.

Heeding a fervent appeal by New York Consul General Howie Prince, who also chairs the Brooklyn-based SVG (St. Vincent and the Grenadines) Relief, Inc., nationals converged on the Friends of Crown Heights Educational Center in Brooklyn to offer support, and to provide funds and supplies.

They brought, among other things, food items, toiletries, clothing and shoes to fill barrels and boxes; and wrote checks to SVG Relief, Inc., which organized the event in conjunction with the Garifuna Indigenous People of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, also based in Brooklyn.

Most members hail from Sandy Bay and other areas north of the Rabacca Dry River, which were mostly affected by the Trough system that impacted the country in recent weeks.

Marsena Ballantyne, with New York Consul General Howie Prince, addresses volunteers at a storm relief event.

Marsena Ballantyne, the group’s Sandy Bay-born president, told Caribbean Life that her group had already shipped eight barrels of supplies, compliments the Brooklyn-based Standard Shippers, owned by Biabou native Gideon “Fessy” York, to help provide relief to residents.

She expects the barrels to arrive home by Dec. 23 — in time for Christmas.

In brief remarks to nationals Sunday afternoon, as they assisted in the relief effort, Prince, the former head of the National Emergency Management Organization, disclosed that the group VincyCares had solicited $1,200.00 from patrons the night before, at its annual Dinner-Dance and Awards Ceremony, at the Friends of Crown Heights Educational Center.

He described as “tremendous” the support of nationals in aiding the relief effort, adding that there is “still a window” to donate relief items.

Adopted from Caribbean life Photo and story credit Nelson King